Activity #7


Music:

  • Students will be able to identify half, dotted half, and simple triple meter. (Oh, How Lovely). (Pr 4.2)
  • Students will compare and provide feedback to evaluate the accuracy and expressiveness of the round. (Oh, How Lovely) (Pr 5.1)
  • Students will recognize how harmony is formed by singers singing two different melodies simultaneously. (Do Re Mi; Oh, How Lovely) (Pr6.1)
  • Students will perform music, alone or with others, with expression, technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation when singing the round (Pr. 6.1) (Oh, How Lovely)

SEL:

The focuses of this unit are to guide students to explore self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.

  • Students will discover how harmony in music can create a harmonious atmosphere among human beings. 
  • Students will be able to discover the relationship among individuals; how role-playing can contribute to making harmony and beautiful performance. When individuals manage their roles appropriately, they will accomplish the task.

 


 

FOCUS KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS SONG
RHYTHM
  • Dotted half note
  • 3/4, Simple Triple Meter
  • Oh, How Lovely
  • The Sound of Music

*Dotted Half Note

Write four measures of quarter notes, with three quarter notes in each measure. Have the students clap the rhythm.

1. Teacher asks students to make the rhythm more interesting by tying some of the notes together to make to-o (or ta-a, half notes).
2. Teacher asks students to tell how many beats a to-o (or ta-a, half notes) gets. (two).
3. Teacher asks students how many beats a ta (quarter note) gets. (one)
4. Is the ta (quarter note) worth half the value of a to-o (or ta-a, half notes)? (yes)
5. When a to-o (or ta-a, half notes) is tied to a ta (quarter note), the ta (quarter note), which is half of the value of the to-o (or ta-a, half notes), will turn into a dot (refer to the figure).
6. This note is called a to-o-o (or ta-a-a, dotted half note) and gets three beats.


When there are three beats in each measure, we name it as simple triple meter.

 

*Permission from Let's Play `Ukulele (Book II), p. 37


Prerequisite:

  • Unison: All voices sing the same melody with the same rhythm.
  • Round: A melody or rhythm that is repeated exactly by a second, third, fourth, etc., voice. In this song, the three groups of singers sing a phrase after each other.

MUSIC: HARMONY

  1. Teacher sings and accompanies the song once with `ukulele, piano, or xylophone. Teach the song:
    • Teach phrase 3; students echo while singing and swinging to the sides.
    • Teach phrase 1; students echo. Repeat a few times.
    • Teach phrase 2; students echo. Repeat a few times.
    • Sing and move with the whole song; repeat at least twice.
  2. After learning the song, ask these questions:
    • What is the key of this song? You may refer to the last note of this song. (C)
    • Identify the rhythmic patterns for measures 13 to 18 (to-o-o or ta-a-a). Are the notes the same or different? (same)
    • Teacher sings the lyrics of the first phrase; students echo.Students identify the rhythmic patterns for measures 1 to 6.
    • Teacher sings the lyrics of the second phrase; students echo. Students identify the rhythmic patterns for measures 7 to 12.
    • Divide the class into three groups and sing this song as a round. Second group starts to sing when the first group begins to sing measure 7. The third group starts to sing when the second group begins to sing measure 7. The teacher plays the chords while the class sings.
    • The class can also perform this round as a dance. 

Dance:

FIRST PHRASE:

1. Students hold hands and form two circles, one inside and one outside.

2. Students on the outside circle hold hands and move counterclockwise while students on the inside circle walk in the opposite direction. Students will step forward on the first beat of the three-meter measures.

 

SECOND PHRASE:

3. Students let go of their hands and turn around in the same spot, continuing to step on the first beat of each three-meter measure. By the end of the phrase, they will face the center of the circle.

 

THIRD PHRASE

4. Students hold hands and step into the center of the circle with the right foot forward and out with the left foot
back (rocking) on the first beat of the three-meter measures while singing the third phrase.

 

*Permission from Let's Play `Ukulele (Book II), p. 41-42

 


SEL:
  • In a football team, does every player has the same position? When we sing a round, do we all sing in unison? Do we play different roles?
  • What happens if someone comes in too early or too late? What happens if someone sings too loud?
  • What happens if someone makes a mistake? Will you get upset?
  • What happens if you make a mistake? Will you get upset? How can we help each other to improve the performance?
  • Do we always need to be perfect?
  • Do you feel good when you sing in harmony and dance with your peers? How can you work with your group to sing this round beautifully? When you sing and dance this song, do you feel the connection between you and your peers?

As a group of singers, we are just like a team of players, we will form a good ensemble or team if we sing our parts or play our positions correctly.


Assessment: Singing

A = 4, Meet Expectation; B = 3, Proficient; C = 2, Developing Proficiency; D = 1, Novice

Grade

A = 4 

Pitch

Student sang with precise pitches and tonal center, with one or two mistakes. Mistakes were corrected right away.

Expression

Student sang with appropriate phrasing, with one mistake. Mistakes were corrected right away.


B = 3

Student sang with tonal center, with three or four mistakes. Mistakes were corrected right away.

Students sang with inconsistent phrasing, with two or three mistakes. Mistakes were corrected right away.


C = 2

Student sang more than five inaccurate pitches and lacked of tonal center. Mistakes were not corrected right away.

Student sang with inconsistent phrasing, with more four mistakes. Mistakes were not corrected right away.


D = 1

Student sang without using singing voice and with no sense of pitch and tonal center.

Student sang with no evidence of phrasing.



Post your comments here:

Comments: 4
  • #4

    Kevin (Thursday, 28 April 2022 15:36)

    Dotted Half Note:
    When using this material in the lesson are we supposed to use "to-o" and "to-o-o" vs. "ta-a" and "ta-a-a"

    Oh How Lovely:

    Step 1. says the students are playing chords "Then, teacher sings and students accompany with the chords." - I think that it would be helpful to specify in the score what chord the students will be playing for teachers who might be unfamiliar with incorporating music.

    Step 3. needs space between "to" and "18" - currently is "13 to18"

    Since Activity #7 focuses on Simple Triple Meter, would it make more sense to place the Sound of Music video in Activity #5 with Bobby McFerrin? I noticed that on the homepage Activity #7 is only listed under the Rhythm category. Alternatively, maybe we can list this Activity under the Harmony category as well?

  • #3

    Janice (Monday, 25 April 2022 01:51)

    Do we need to add in instructions about 3/4 time? We clearly lay out dotted half note but just wondering if we are simply stating what 3/4 time is.

    I think we should make a video on how we would sing "Oh How Lovely..." in rhythm. I've found that while we make the physical motion of the half/dotted half length, we say it syllabically which then messes the students up when they perform those rhythms.

  • #2

    Lauren F (Saturday, 23 April 2022 01:43)

    This is worded a bit awkwardly:
    Students will recognize and perform how harmony is formed by singers singing two different melodies simultaneously. (Do Re Mi; Oh, How Lovely) (Pr5.1)


    Students will be able to discover the relationship among individuals; <"how role"> playing can contribute to making harmony, <"and a"> beautiful performance. When individuals manage their roles appropriately, they will accomplish the task.

    Write 4 measures of quarter notes in three <three/ta or 3/4 meter> and have the students clap the rhythm. Or rephrase to: Write 4 measures of quarter notes, with three quarter notes in each measure.

    1. Teacher sings and accompanies the song once. Then, teacher sings and students accompany with the chords. <What are we accompanying it with? drone? ostinato?>

    3. Identify the rhythmic patterns for measures 13 to18 <(to-o-o)>. Are the notes the same or different? (same) Students sing the lyrics for measures 13 to 18, the teacher accompanies with the chords.

    Again may need to clarify to teachers that they should not show the notation to the students. Do you want to show them and have them perform them on rhythm syllables or do you want them to abstract them?

    Harmony
    Let's watch another clip of the Sound of Music. Can you recognize when Maria and the siblings sing in harmony? Note that harmony is formed by singers singing two different melodies simultaneously. <Answer: when the kids are on the bikes some are holding a solfege note while the others are singing the melody. When they are in the carriage, the kids sing their melody using solfege and Maria sings using lyrics/words. At the end on the stairs, they are singing in harmony with different melodies using solfege.>

    SEL:
    In a football team, does every player has <have> the same position? When we sing a round, do we all sing in unison? <Maybe we need to clearly define unison and harmony earlier in the lesson, or is this pre-requisite knowledge >Do we play different roles?
    What happens if someone comes in too early or too late? What happens if someone sings too loud?
    What happens if someone makes a mistake? Will you get upset?
    What happens if you make a mistake? Will you get upset? How can we help each other to improve the performance?
    Do we always need to be perfect?
    Do you feel good when you sing in harmony and dance with your peers? How can you work with your group to sing this round beautifully? When you sing and dance this song, do you feel the connection between you and your peers?
    As a group of singers, <we are> just like a team of players, we will form a good ensemble or team if we sing our parts or play our positions correctly.

  • #1

    Katherine (Wednesday, 20 April 2022 19:57)

    The last bullet under SEL was in a different activity as well so I believe I mentioned it before, but I would consider changing the wording to "Students will be able to discover the importance of relationships among individuals. Having different roles can contribute to making harmony and a beautiful performance."

    For your note about the instructions being short, are you referring to the section with the do-re-mi video, or do you mean overall?