Activity #8: 16th notes


Music:

  • Students will evaluate their peers and their Dalcroze activity movement performance by referring to the provided criteria. (Re 9.1) (Dalcroze activity)
  • Students will identify sixteenth notes. (Dalcroze activity & Waimānalo Warriors) (Pr 4.2)
  • Students will perform music,  with others, with expression, technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation. (Pr. 6.1) (Waimānalo Warriors)
  • Students will use local Hawaiian names and terms to represent their neighborhood community by creating four 4-measure chants in standard notations (quarter note, pair-eighth, 16th, and half notes). (Cr2.1)

SEL:

The focuses of this unit are to guide students to explore self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.

  • Students will become aware of utilizing local Hawaiian names and terms to create chants to represent their neighborhood community.
  • Students will be able to discover the relationship among individuals; roles playing can contribute to making harmony, beautiful performance. When individuals manage their roles appropriately, they will accomplish the task.

 

 


 

FOCUS KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS ACTIVITIES
RHYTHM
  • 16th notes
  • Dalcroze game
  • Waimānalo Warriors

Eurhythmics activity:

Children spread out in the room. Teacher improvises on piano walking (quarter). When the teacher plays four-16th notes, students will i) stop or ii) turn (choose one). Students listen and respond to the different rhythmic patterns accordingly. See video. 



Dalcroze 16th note Cup Game

During the pandemic, this Dalcroze game was modified; the children may play the game while sitting on chairs. Teachers pair the students; they may watch and learn from each other during this activity.

Children spread out 4 cups on the table. The teacher plays on temple block (or piano) with sixteenth (16th) and quarter notes. When the children hear four-16th notes, they will “walk” the cup following the tempo. When four-16th notes are played again, they will stop. The children will only stack the cups and move when they hear the following four-16th notes. The game continues until all the cups are stacked onto each other. If any of them moves when other notes are played, they will need to unstack the cups and start from the beginning.


SEL:
  • Could you tell when you made a mistake on your own? Were you honest about it? Is it okay to make mistakes?   
  • How can you encourage your partner when they make a mistake?    

Activity #9: Waimānalo Warriors

Teach the below chant to the students. For all the 16th notes, pat those on the laps. Watch the video.


Waimānalo warriors, Waimānalo beach.
Waimānalo wins are what we seek.
Waimānalo warriors, Waimānalo beach.
Waimānalo wins are what we seek.

 

Hele mai (ugh!), come and cheer the team. 

Hele mai (ugh!), you will see us beam.

Hele mai (ugh!), come and cheer the team. 

Hele mai (ugh!), you will see us win.


Janice - Sixteenth Notes:
We need a visual instruction/practice part. Maybe something like:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N6XgTGb5-kJAyD1-O1lIE34F3EMfiDvV/view

Janice, the term that you use is different. It might create confusion. Is it enough to read the notations from the above chant?

SEL:
  • What are some poses that are considered "safe" if you can't think of anything at the moment?  Janice, what does at this moment mean? 
  • Did everyone do the same poses? Is it okay to choose the same pose as someone else? Is it appropriate to do something different? (expression/creativity)      
  • How does it feel when a performance goes well?    
  • What are the things we need to prepare before performing for others?   

Boomwhackers

Students may play the chant by using the boomwhackers. Note that boomwhackers are in F pentatonic (notes F, G, A, C, & D), the same notes that the students learn in the second section. Pentatonic scale forms good harmony.

I probably need to add more instructions. Any suggestions?

SEL:
  • When playing the boomwhackers, how did you demonstrate responsible decision-making or self-management?
  • What were the things your group did well to work as a team? What are some things that didn't go so well? How did this affect the way the music sounded?     
  • Did you enjoy making music with your friends? How did working with others add to the quality of the performance? (Possible answers: able to add harmony, divide the rhythms/roles, able to perform in different formations, shapes, able to connect with others, able to create more excitement/synergy, etc.) 
  • What are some words you can use to describe your community?  

Comments: 4
  • #4

    Kevin Morita (Monday, 23 May 2022 23:26)

    I noticed activities 3-8 do not have the navigation bar at the top. I liked having the other activities linked for quick and easy access.

  • #3

    Janice Boychuk (Monday, 16 May 2022 20:55)

    1. 16th note visual: They can use the chant for visual identification but shouldn’t there be another practice thing? Even as simple as students echo play sixteenth note rhythm patterns.

    2. In my class, some students don’t feel comfortable coming up with their own movement during improvising parts so as a class we come up with a “safe” movement they can use if they can’t think of something.

  • #2

    Janice (Monday, 25 April 2022 02:58)

    Sixteenth Notes:
    We need a visual instruction/practice part. Maybe something like:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N6XgTGb5-kJAyD1-O1lIE34F3EMfiDvV/view

    Cup Stacking:
    Put in a suggestion to do this activity as a partner activity? That way one can watch if the other makes a mistake.
    Waimanalo Warriors:
    I agree with Lauren, can we put in the lyrics?

    SEL:
    Cup Stacking:
    What can you do to show grit when you make a mistake?
    How can you encourage your partner when they make a mistake?

    Waimanalo Warriors:
    What are some poses that are considered "safe" if you can't think of anything in the moment?
    What are some words you can use to describe your community?
    How does it feel when a performance goes well?
    When is a performance ready for others to watch?



  • #1

    Lauren F (Saturday, 23 April 2022 02:30)

    Students will be able to discover the relationship among individuals; roles <role> playing can contribute to making harmony, <and a> beautiful performance. When individuals manage their roles appropriately, they will accomplish the task.

    Students will become aware of utilizing local Hawaiian names and terms to create chants to represent their neighborhood community. <I'm not sure they did this in the lesson. They perform the Waimanalo one, but not really created a chant on their own.>

    In the first video:
    Children spread out in the room. Teacher improvises on piano walking (quarter), running (two eighths), or big-step (half note) notes on a piano. Students listen and react to the music by either walking, running, or taking big steps. When the teacher plays four-16th notes, students will i) stop or ii) turn (choose one). Students respond to the different rhythmic patterns accordingly. See video.
    <You didn't really do any of the other motions, except walking, unless I'm mistaken, so maybe take out the other instructions about eighths or half notes or reemphasize that this is just an example and teachers improvise something on their own.>
    <You may want to say for the stopping motion that they resume walking when they hear the sixteenth notes again.>
    <Are these just pre-preparation activities or do we need to label sixteenth notes?>

    Waimanalo Warriors
    Teach the below chant to the students. <I don't know this one. Maybe include the words to the beginning of the chant as well.>

    SEL:
    Cup stacking:
    Could you tell when you made a mistake on your own? Were you honest about it? Is it okay to make mistakes?

    Waimanalo Warriors:
    Did everyone do the same poses? Is it okay to choose the same pose as someone else? Is it okay to do something different? (expression/creativity)
    When playing the boomwhackers, how did you demonstrate responsible decision making or self-management? What were some things that your group did well to work as a team? What are some things that didn't go so well? How did this affect the way the music sounded?

    Did you enjoy making music with your friends? How did working with others add to the quality of the performance? <Possible answers: able to add harmony, dividing up the rhythms/roles, able to perform in different formations, shapes, able to connect with others, able to create more excitement/synergy, etc.>