Activity #10: Dotted quarter-eighth notes (Tai-ti)

Music:
The focuses are to introduce students to musical elements: rhythm; and guide students to explore how composers composed pieces affected by the social, and cultural events that happened at that time.
  • Students will be able to perform and explain how the selection of music is influenced by personal interest, social context, and purposes. (We Shall Over Come). (Pr4.1)
  • Students will be able to identify dotted quarter and simple quadruple meter. (Do Re Mi, We Shall Over Come) (Pr4.2)
  • Students will identify and respond to the context of music from a variety of genres, cultures, and historical periods. (We Shall Over Come) (Re: 7.2)

SEL:

The focuses of this unit are to guide students to explore self-awareness,  social awareness, and relationship skills.

  • Students will be able to explore how people make music and how the different styles of music affect our emotional feelings.
  • Students will be able to discover the importance of relationships among individuals and communities. Performing the same music in a different context can create different emotional reactions.

Students will be able to identify 16th notes. (Dalcroze Game, Waimānalo Warriors)

 

FOCUS KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS SONGS/CHANTS/BOOKS

RHYTHM

 

FORM

 

STYLE

  • Dotted quarter-eighth (tai-ti)
  • Same and different phrases 
  • STYLE
  • We Shall Overcome

Style

Watch the below video that is about the history of We Shall Overcome.

We Shall Overcome is a song sung by protestors who marched for equality during the Civil Rights Movement. Enslaved African Americans originally sang it before being formally published by Reverend Charles Albert Tindley as the hymn, "I'll Overcome Someday." Over time, the song has been adapted, changed, and eventually popularized by folk singer Pete Seeger. It continues to be a song of hope and a rallying cry for the work that must continue for peace and freedom.


Pete Seeger, a famous American folk singer talked about the song We Shall Overcome.

SEL:
  • Introduce the history of the We Shall Overcome to the students (melody and lyrics). How did it evolve?
  • What is the meaning of the song to African Americans and those involved in the Civil Rights/Black Lives Matter Movement?
  •  What would it mean to empathize with this song and the people singing it?
  • What feelings does it communicate?
  • How can music bring people together?

Below is a video of Maggie Hoffee singing We Shall Overcome.

During the lockdown, Maggie lost her dear brother. It was a challenging time for Maggie and her family. Even with sadness, Maggie sang We Shall Overcome with the hope we would stand together and overcome the pandemic. (I will ask Maggie whether she can add some words here)

SEL:
  • How do you feel when listening to Pete Seeger singing We Shall Overcome compared to Maggie? Did you feel sad, angry, anxious, empathy?
  • How do our personal experiences affect how we feel about certain songs?
  • Do you associate certain songs with specific memories or experiences? Explain.
  • Is there a connection you can make to We Shall Overcome in your life? If not, is there another song with a personal meaning for you (especially if you are going through something challenging, for example, during the pandemic)?
  • Relate to COVID-19, do you think we will overcome the crisis?
  • When Maggie sang, did she the exact rhythm and notes? Why do you think she sang differently?

Dotted Quarter and eight note (Tai-ti)

In Activity #1, students learned that ta = one beat and ti-ti = one beat. (Notice that it takes two tis, ti-ti, to make one beat.) So, one ti is half of a ta, or a half beat.
When we write ti-ti, the notes are connected with a beam.

When ti-ti is separated, the beam turns into flags.

When one ti is tied to a ta, the ti turns into a dot. We call the new note tai. A tai is usually followed by one ti creating the rhythm tai-ti. A tai-ti gets two beats.



Dotted Quarter-Eighth notes and major scale

  • Let's look at phrase #1 We Shall Overcome. Can you identify the dotted-eighth (tai-ti) notes?

  • Speak the rhythm with ta, tai-ti, and to-o.

  • Speak then sing lyrics following the rhythm.


The below score is for teachers' reference. Please note that students haven't learned triplet and whole note.


SEL:
  • We Shall Overcome uses a major scale. How does that affect the message or feelings that the song communicates?
  • How does the sound of songs change when we have two additional notes (fa, ti) instead of a pentatonic scale? Does it add different colors or characteristics to the melody? (When we have more notes, it's possible to move more by step versus skip and/or the skips can be more unpredictable.) Lauren, can you add a sentence about the colors?
  • What emotions do you feel after listening to We Shall Overcome? How does the song communicate these feelings through musical elements (tone, tempo, harmony, dynamics, form, etc.)?
  • Who does this song "belong" to? Is it appropriate to sing it outside of the Civil Rights context?

Post your comments here

Comments: 4
  • #4

    Kevin Morita (Monday, 23 May 2022 23:27)

    Activities 10, 11, and 12 have Activity #2 listed in the wrong order at the top when compared to the other pages.

  • #3

    Kevin Morita (Sunday, 15 May 2022 20:02)

    The score says "hold note" instead of "whole note"

    I like Lauren's questions and also agree on her comment from Unit 9 regarding not having a bunch of SEL questions for every unit. I think the topics covered in this lesson will have more meaningful responses through SEL questions.

    Dr. Loong, I have a question. What specifically would be included when teaching transposition in these units? Would it be providing materials for the teachers to use/supplement so that they can adjust and modify for their students? Or would it be teaching students what transposition is? Or even teaching students how to start transposition?

    I know that these are meant to be units and not lessons, but could we do something like a pre-prepare here where teachers just introduce moveable do without going into specific transposition concepts until a future unit? Since non-music teachers could be using this material, I think it would benefit them to not include so much in Units 9 and 10.

  • #2

    Katherine (Sunday, 15 May 2022 16:07)

    SEL section 1:
    What do you think African Americans might have been feeling while singing this song?
    What would it mean to empathize with this song and the people singing it?

    SEL section 2 and 3:
    I was trying to think of more questions to add that wouldn't be redundant from what Lauren already suggested, but I can't think of too many more. I like Lauren's questions!

    I don't think we would necessarily need to add another tai-ti song. There is already a lot in this one lesson. We could maybe add a short practice activity for tai-ti, but I don't feel that another song with tai-ti is necessary.

  • #1

    Lauren F (Tuesday, 10 May 2022 18:04)

    *remove this:
    Students will be able to identify 16th notes. (Dalcroze Game, Waimānalo Warriors)*
    -----------
    "We Shall Overcome" is a song that was sung by protestors who marched for equality during the Civil Rights Movement. It was originally sung by enslaved African Americans before being formally published by Reverend Charles Albert Tindley, as the hymn, "I'll Overcome Someday." Over time, the song has been adapted and changed, and was eventually popularized by folk singer, Pete Seger. It continues to be song of hope, and a rallying cry for the work that must continue for peace and freedom.
    ------------
    SEL:
    What is the meaning of the song to African Americans and those involved in the Civil Rights/Black Lives Matter Movement?
    What feelings does it communicate?
    How can music bring people together?
    ---------
    SEL:
    How do our own personal experiences affect how we feel about certain songs?
    Do you associate certain songs with certain memories or experiences? Explain.
    Is there a connection in your life that you can make to "We Shall Overcome"? If not, is there another song that has a personal meaning for you, (especially if you are going through something challenging or difficult)?
    ----------
    The below score is for teachers' reference. Please note that students haven't learned triplet and hold (*change to whole) note.
    *Actually in the white boxes on the top, one of the objectives is for students to be able to identify a whole note, so maybe take that out or make consistent.
    ------------
    SEL:
    What emotions do you feel after listening to "We Shall Overcome"? How does the song communicate these feelings through musical elements (tone, tempo, harmony, dynamics, form, etc.)?
    Who does this song "belong" to? Is it appropriate to sing it outside of the Civil Rights context? (maybe this goes in the previous SEL section... if you want to use it... not sure if it's too controversial)

    ---------------
    Do you think we should add another song with tai-ti. Music alone shall live has it, but it is too low if we sing in C major. We haven't taught F major. You think we should teach transposition?
    I think teachers can add their own tai-ti songs if they want to. It seems a lot of work to go through for the purposes of this project. As you say, these aren't lessons... I think it would kind of take away from the central focus of "We Shall Overcome"... there's already a lot with the history component. Just my 2 cents.